Spot 12 Wins Award!

Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU has won the 2017 Next Generation Indie Book Awards in the Parenting/Family category. This is a huge honor! I even won a small cash prize as part of the award. I’m awed. Here is the awards announcement.

The award ceremony took place in June in New York during the Book Expo America, which I hear is a big shin-dig. Just as I wrapped up House of Rougeaux, my first novel, I began writing the next book in what will be a series. I did not plan it this way, but turns out there is more to tell. I have been collaborating with the publisher and designer, working on getting the cover for House of Rougeaux just right. We’ve been working for months now. It’ll be nice to finally get to that stage where the advance copies are printed, hopefully soon. Stay tuned for more about House of Rougeaux, like a description and the cover! It’s scheduled to publish in the Spring of 2018.

 

 

Spot 12 Publishes Today

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I’m excited for Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU to reach a larger audience. Sometimes people ask me what it’s like to reveal such a personal story, and personal struggle, in such a public way. For better or worse, I told it all, but I don’t find the public part too hard. This story is something that happened to a human being under difficult circumstances, and as humans we often find ourselves facing ourselves facing difficulty. I believe we can learn a lot from each other when we share those struggles, and by sharing we learn we have permission to have our experiences as we have them. Should we have been stronger in those hard times? Better somehow? Probably not. Did we learn a lot? Totally. My best hope for Spot 12 is that readers find in it a kind of solidarity. Whatever we go through in this life is something we can share.

Jenny Jaeckel

 

Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU

by Jenny Jaeckel

www.spot12book.com

ISBN 978-1-941203-11-8

Spanish ISBN 978-1-941203-12-5 (Cunero 12)

8×10 trade paper

116 pages

b&w illustrations

Distribution: SPU

Description:

A routine prenatal exam reveals a dangerous problem, and Jaeckel and her husband find themselves thrust into a world of close calls, sleepless nights, and psychological crises. Surrounded by disagreements and family tensions, death, and questions of faith, Jaeckel struggles to maintain a positive frame of mind. Against the antiseptic, mechanical reality of the NICU, the dedicated doctors and nurses are drawn as sympathetic and wry animal characters. Doctor Eyes and Nurse Gentlehands are two of the caring individuals who do all they can to save Baby Asa. At times Jaeckel and her husband battle feelings of helplessness and despair, but their determination, hope, insight, bravery, and connection ultimately helps keep their little girl alive.

Siberiak Reviewed in Publishers Weekly

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Publishers Weekly reviewed my graphic memoir Siberiak: My Cold War Adventure on the River Ob on October 6th, 2014. Cover design by Josue Menjivar and Fresh Brewed Illustration.

 

Publishers Weekly Review:

“In a graphic novel originally self-published by the author in 2011, Jaeckel recalls her participation in a remarkable cultural exchange at the height of U.S.–Soviet tensions in the 1980s. Along with 24 other American high-school students, Jaeckel joined a group of Soviet teenagers to cycle, row, and raft down Siberia’s river Ob in a trip meant to further peace. In simple, pared-down b&w cartoons, Jaeckel creates a cast of human-animal hybrids, giving the Americans long, floppy ears and the Russians neat, cropped ears and sharper snouts; throughout, she records discoveries about the ways her Russian counterparts are either unexpectedly similar to Americans (they love the Beatles) or unlike them (boys and girls display easy, unself-conscious physical affection toward members of their own sexes). Jaeckel documents a kaleidoscope of impressions and perceptions, including her own small contributions toward international relations, as when she’s confronted by four grim-faced grandmothers, greets them in tentative Russian, and is rewarded with broad grins. With an emphasis on dialogue and interior reflection, it’s an honest, closely observed account that readers–especially those with an interest in Russia–will find fascinating.”